We motivate businesses to be human

Archive for Centeredness

Tango and Life. Or, how I found flow




Last week I finally went to my first Milonga (Tango Argentino). Was I nervous? Yes, I was. I only started to learn Tango only a few months ago, consider myself an absolute beginner (I am), didn’t want to make a fool of myself , didn’t want to hurt anyone on the dance floor (it is crowded), could only do a few moves (compared to what the semi-pros on the dance floor showed), …, and the list goes on and on. Today I know that it was and is a list of excuses, lame excuses that is.

726882_original_r_k_by_joachim-kant_pixelio-de

[Photo © Joachim Kant | pixelio.de]

So, how was my first Milonga?

Well, especially in the beginning I felt more like an elephant on ice. My brain was mush, no, empty. It seemed that I had forgotten everything I learned in my dance classes. I felt like a rock in a storm, not able to move one inch. At the same time my head was full of, well, I don’t know what it was – void, heat, concerns, fear?

Breaking the ice

Luckily, I was not alone. The first dance with my wife was actually passable. Both of us were nervous. And yet we survived. “Time to sit down and rest, recuperate, refresh”, I thought. But the minute I sat down a friend of mine asked me to dance with her. Ooops. Here it was again, fear crawling up my stomach, my brain turning into mush.

On the other side, my dance partner was very understanding and encouraging. I think we did ok; at least, nobody was hurt. 🙂 The first ice was broken.

Going for flow

Time went on, was flying. Soon three hours passed. I still felt “foreign”, but not like an elephant on ice anymore, maybe more like a dog on ice.

And then there were 3-4 dances when time stood still; when all of sudden I let go of all pressure, concerns, thoughts, and all I did was listening to the music and dance with my partner. Our steps and moves flew naturally. It was smooth sailing. And with it came joy, relaxation, big inner smiles and grins. Both of us were stunned and perplexed. Amazing.

Ok, 3-4 dances out of 20 or more is not that much. But it was more than enough to motivate us to plan our next Milonga. And we are really looking forward to it.   Will it be better? Possibly and probably, for this first Milonga revealed something magical.

The secret of flow

I realized that I still have to learn a lot. Technically? Yes. But more so about letting go, relaxing, listening to the music, going with the flow, looking for and moving into free spaces, being in the moment. Letting go and being and going with the moment seems to be, no, is the key to experiencing joy and flow on the dance floor.

This was and is the outstanding insight of my first Milonga – about Tango as well as life.

Tango and life

People say that Tango is a reflection of life. This is so true. And it is not the Milongas, it is also the Tango lessons, the learning experiences bringing excitement, motivation, joy, frustration, depression, worries, concerns, fears. Tango can teach you a lot about your attitude and practice in life, about your partnerships, your love, your outlook, your flow (or the lack therof), your being. It drastically reveals your state of life.

If Tango doesn’t flow quite yet, check your present life style, your family life, your friendships, partnerships and professional environment. Are you limiting your thinking, are you trying to structure, plan and control it? This may work at times and yield satisfactory results. But, if you truly want to dance in your flow, you have to let go of limiting thoughts, concerns, fears. Jumping into the cold water, showing and expressing who you are in this moment. Could very well be that it is not “perfect” in the eye of some beholders and the greatest critic (which is probably you yourself).

Motivation to be human

We are human with imperfections which make us perfect; we are not machines. Ripping yourself off false expectations and just go and play like a kid is refreshing and rewarding like nothing else. Because it helps you be human and find and be yourself again.

So, what are you waiting for?! Go out and find your Tango and Tango along!

Posted in: Centeredness, Happiness, Human

Leave a Comment (0) →

3 Most Common Barriers Keeping Conscious Business Leaders on the Hamster Wheel

[originally published in the Huffington Post on 25 Nov 2016]

If there ever was a time to realize creative potential inside companies it is now. A quick look at the top issues facing companies of all sizes reveals the usual short list: attracting and retaining talent, managing reputation, with the need to create flexible workplaces and balance benefits with bottom line. While tempting to view these challenges with concern over the bottom line, doing so sabotages gains possible when entrepreneurial spirit applied to innovation is ignited full throttle. Even conscious business leaders, who keep an eye on the horizon (longer term), getting work done and being attentive to workplace dynamics, are still susceptible to running around in circles.

In case the term ‘spirit’ is distracting, a definition is in order. Personal spirit refers to three measurable elements:

  1. initiative,
  2. sense of control, and
  3. outlook on life.

Entrepreneurial spirit combines personal spirit with a sense of adventure, willingness to experiment, an insatiable desire to learn and a capacity to bounce forward.

Without entrepreneurial spirit at play, companies plod through the motions, guided by habitual processes and routine. The company runs on auto-pilot so much so that either the purpose of the task is assumed, or the underlying agenda is to explicitly or implicitly control behavior. Either way, the company falls asleep at the wheel numbing leaders into the same repetitive albeit comfortable cycle. Running hard to wind up in the same place.

Context Drives Behaviour and Regulates Entrepreneurial Spirit

The term ‘conscious business leaders’ applies to a small group since

85% of leaders in the U.S. are operating at the survival level. [See Seizing the Executive Imperative To Expand Consciousness] One source of the hamster wheel is the existence of internal politics. Behind internal politics is the desire to protect personal reputation at the expense of achieving business goals. Aversion to risk, and therefore innovation, is inherent. Entrepreneurial spirit suffocates in working climates where trust is low and expression of diverse ideas is suppressed. In contrast, innovation requires creativity and a comfort with uncertainty.

The Impact of Systemic Barriers

Systemic beliefs add to the pressure of delivering on short-term goals blocking innovation and adaptability. Attracting and retaining talent, or mitigating risks to reputation are restricted to a narrow set of strategies arising from one or more of these three dangerous barriers:

custom_sign_with_traffic_cones_11627Focusing on Recurring and Constant Barriers

Characteristic of problem oriented, adrenaline charged companies is the persistent focus on solving problems. Problems love analytical thinking. Innovation on the other side requires exploratory thinking – the opposite of problem solving. Linear thinking doesn’t help because problem solving tends to assume that there is a singular root cause. In a complex system, multiple causes exist. Unless perception is expanded you will find yourself running in circles: busy but not productive.

Asking leaders to innovate and apply their entrepreneurial spirit while continuing to focus on barriers keeps everyone running in a loop.

Personal Impact:

Leaders find themselves chasing problems. Since what you focus on expands, problems also expand. Adrenaline is addictive as is the illusion of feeling in control. In workplaces designed to control behaviour, business leaders at every level will find themselves repeating the same patterns over and over again.

Insight
Awareness of what you are focusing on helps you develop flexibility in how you perceive (see) the situation. Increasing flexibility gives you more options, while letting go of the need to control everyone else. It is a start at least.

custom_sign_with_traffic_cones_11627-3Falling Unconsciously into Organizational Patterns and Behaviors

Beliefs keep decisions running in a rut and operate without being noticed until you systematically poke them to the surface. For example, walk into a company that believes it exists to purely make a profit and you will find behaviours shaped by those beliefs. Or if, for instance, the core belief is that employees must be told what to do, then selection of metrics and implementation of performance management strategies will reflect that belief. Beliefs drive decisions unless the company and business leaders have deliberately worked with values as a principle-based approach to decision making.

Where habitual patterns operate on unchecked auto-pilot, efforts to explore and experiment (the prerequisites for innovation / entrepreneurial spirit) run smack into complacent thinking. “Do something different, but don’t change anything.”

Organizational Impact:

Take a look at the metrics. Whenever a company focuses on quantitative measures and statistics alone, meaning is likely to be missing. Without meaning there is no inspiration and no fuel to fire up creativity, much needed for innovative responses to uncertainty.

Insight
Reflecting to observe patterns in recurring issues or undesirable results, strengthens ability to pivot.

custom_sign_with_traffic_cones_11627-2Losing Connection to What Matters Most to You

By far the biggest barrier is to sight of what matters most to you as a fully aware and caring human being with a desire to contribute your talent to something meaningful. Yes, food needs to be put on the table but the days of trading your soul for security are gone. Rather than being driven by the need for societal approval or by metrics that manipulate behavior reconnecting to your personal sense of purpose and of inspiration is the only door available going forward.

Insight
Personal reflection to identify what you rely on: social approval, meeting external expectations for instance, enables you to chart a course toward personal fulfillment.

What do you see as the barriers to stepping off the hamster wheel and do what you believe, deep down, you’re truly capable of?

About Dawna Jones:

Dawna Jones delivers customized workshops and insights raising leadership and decision making awareness of a wider spectrum of skills and intelligences. She provides dynamic oversight into organizational change initiatives by spotting the patterns, and openings for innovation and fresh approaches to working with complex adaptive systems. Contact Dawna through LinkedIn or directly at www.FromInsightToAction.com

Follow Great Work Cultures on Twitter: www.twitter.com/GWCLeadLink

Posted in: Centeredness, Future of Work, Guest Blogs, Institute, Uncategorized

Leave a Comment (0) →

In Search for the Ideal Company


Over the last two decades I have worked for a number of companies, consulted even more. Some of them were outstanding, others were, well, less so. It is time to reflect and share what I believe are

3 characteristics of a well-run business and desired place to work and be

hand_thumbs_up_cuff_15176(1) Client delight

  • You don’t just satisfy, you delight your customers. You listen, understand and address their needs. It is a relationship, a dialogue. Not too surprising your customers not only come back to you but refer and recommend your company and its products and services to family and friends.
  • The products and services you provide are of high quality. Period. And it doesn’t end with the delivery of a product; it continues with an outstanding customer service. Want an example? Try Tesla Motors.
  • High quality of development of products and/or services. Whether you follow traditional best practices or practice lean and agile production methodologies and frameworks, the development of your product and/or services is committed to quality from the beginning to end, without compromises. This is faster, cheaper, safer and more rewarding to everyone involved.
  • You have an ear to the market and you deliver fast.
  • Your employees are committed to delight your customers because they know your and their customers. They understand and live quality and support company goals because they are shaping them, too.

group_jumping_up_400_clr_12574(2) A happy workplace

  • Your employees are not human resources, they are people and you treat them as such. Consequently, there is no “Human Resources” department; you call it “People Services” or “People Centre”. It not just a term, it is a philosophy and practice.
  • Your employees are inspired, motivated and performing, they enjoy their work because they can identify with the purpose of the company, love working with their colleagues and serving their customers, are passionate about their work and enjoy a safe, secure workplace.
  • The workforce is one big functioning organism. There is no place for static organizational hierarchies and distance between management and “the rest”. The communication style is open, transparent and conversational (vs. top-down and hierarchical).
  • You have and support autonomous teams with clear visions, objectives, roles & responsibilities.
  • Corporate leadership doesn’t cling to external “power and authority” but actively build future leaders and empowers their workforce.
  • Your company is the place to work. Not too surprisingly, turnover and sick days are low, very low.

Growth curve(3) Business value

  • You understand that short-term profits (EBIT) are the means and not the purpose of organizational performance. Instead you focus on long-term business performance parameters such Returns on Assets (ROA).
  • Your company has a positive business outlook. This is reflected in a positive, expected revenue stream, forecasted ROA, outstanding quality of the development of your products and/or services and, last but not least, a happy workplace (see above).
  • You continuously strive to become better, better and better. Innovation spans products, services, processes and your own people.
  • Innovation is not limited to a closed and exclusive „innovation department“. Innovation is open and everyone in the company is involved and participates. You encourage and empower your people to think outside the box. You don’t punish mistakes and failures but take them as learning opportunities. Hence, you recognize people’s ideas and celebrate successes together.

Excite! – Build your own ideal company

neutral Leadership Cycle of Organizational ExcellenceOver the last 18 months I have developed a comprehensive toolkit to evaluate and unfold the organizational potential and performance. It is simple, practical and applicable for short-, mid- and long-term organizational needs. It helps deliver measurable business results for client delight, a happy workplace, and business value. It does not create administrative effort without any sustainable value. As a matter of fact it fosters self-organizing, scalable best-practice sharing.

I call this toolkit and approach “Excite!” because unfolding organizational potential can and is exciting indeed. But, and this is a big “but”, it requires an open mind and common intent to unfold organizational potential and performance.   Not every company has this mindset. But then, not every company is the ideal company, the best place to work and be. It is a matter of choice.

Have I always worked for an ideal company? Well, no, not always; but, yes, I have worked for companies and teams that followed the principles outlined above (one of them was (during my times there) Cambridge Technology Partners and Vail Resorts). And if a company I work for is not ideal I always have a choice: I leave the company or help unfold its potential and performance. The latter is what motivates me.

Posted in: Centeredness, Creative Economy, Happiness, innovation, Leadership, Tools, WOW projects

Leave a Comment (0) →

How to achieve organizational excellence: Appreciate your performance to unfold your potential

“Kumbaya” – or practicing traditional organizational development

About a year ago I told a friend of mine that my new project was in organizational development. He congratulated me and then asked, “so you are sitting in a circle around a bonfire and sing Kumbaya?” and smiled. He continued to explain that organizational development (OD) is often considered a theoretical, abstract, academic and sometimes even esoteric activity with no immediate, tangible or sustainable results. Nothing people and even less organizations can relate to. He claimed that that traditional OD often focused too much on processes and procedures. It didn’t adequately address the potential of people innovation in addition to product and process innovation. Furthermore, traditional OD activities often added administrative effort absorbing already scarce resources – without generating value for clients, people in the organization or the business. – Wow, that was a statement! And it kept me thinking for awhile. What if he was right?! What was I up against?!

The futility of organizational development

Today, a year later, I admit that my friend was (for the most part) right. What do you need organizational development for in a company that has been successfully in business for several years? To me it seems arrogant and ignorant approaching a business stating that you will help it develop its organization. I mean, what has this company been doing the last couple of years?

And yet, just because a company has been successfully been in business it doesn’t mean that it cannot improve its organizational performance and excel to the next level (see my previous post on organizational excellence here). The question is how to get there.

You are great already!

In my experience it is best to invite a company to first appreciate its existing performance. Where does it perform, how and why? What makes it so special? By focusing on the positive, on past accomplishments and present performance you create an environment that invites people to think of additional ways and means to improve their performance, taking it to the next level. The cool thing is that it is not rocket science. Just the opposite! All you need to do is find people who can talk about their experience and are willing to share stories. And this shouldn’t be too difficult! Putting this into the context of organizational excellence, the following questions serve as a guideline:

  • What is your understanding of client delight, a happy workplace, business value and continuous self-improvement? What story can you or do you want people to tell about your group / division with respect to client delight, a happy workplace, business value and continuous self-improvement?
  • What are the critical success factors for client delight, a happy workplace, business value and continuous self-improvement?
  • How do you secure client delight, a happy workplace, business value and continuous self-improvement ? E.g., through what products (portfolio, innovation, customer, etc.), people (individuals, leadership development, org. structure, etc.) or processes (strategies, policies, tools, etc.)?
  • How do you measure client delight, a happy workplace, business value and continuous self-improvement?
  • What do you invest to achieve client delight, a happy workplace, business value and continuous self-improvement?
  • What benefits do you get or expect from investing in client delight, a happy workplace, business value and continuous self-improvement?
  • What do you value most? Client delight, a happy workplace, business value or continuous self-improvement?

I have posed these questions in both workshop settings as well as online questionnaires. Workshop settings are more productive because they are more interactive and you get feedback immediately and this in return can generate new input, ideas and inspiration.

Appreciating your performance is setting the stage for continuous improvement

What I have found out is that once you have a group of people talk about their past accomplishments and present performance people can easily point out areas they want (or need) to improve. Hence, in a second question round, using the same questions as before, I am asking the group what they would like to improve and what possibly holds them back from doing so.

The third step is to plan concrete activities to overcome the impediments, draft a plan for any improvement activities, prioritize them (this is one reason why we asked the question, “What do you value most?”), identify owners and agree on an action plan and schedule.

Note that this process is not pre-determined or defined top-down. It comes from the people present. They identify their areas of improvements. And it is set in the context of past and present performance which fills them with pride and a sense of accomplishments. These are ingredients for motivation and the drive to excel.

The role of mindful leadership in unfolding organizational potential

What is my role in this process? I am not creating or defining activities for organizational improvements. The people do this by themselves. All I do is to facilitate. I help set the stage, invite people to this workshop or exchange of stories and kick off the dialogue and then let go. My role is more that of a conductor, you can say. But once the orchestra starts playing and has built momentum I step back, offer help only if needed or asked for. This is what help for unfolding organizational potential is all about. It is not an active, pushy part. It is an act of generative listening. Sounds simple; and it actually is.

Generative listening helps unfold organizational potential

And yet, listening, from all leadership capacities, probably is the one that’s most underrated. Everyone talks about vision, project objectives, project management technical skills, etc. But listening is really at the source of all great leadership. Listening ensures that leaders connect with the situation at hand. Any lack of listening skills therefore leads to a disconnection between leaders on the on the one hand and reality on the other. This can be fatal in a project setting that aims to improve the performance of an organization.

MIT senior lecturer Otto Scharmer distinguishes between 4 levels of listening (see Scharmer, C. O., & Kaufer, K. (2013). Leading from the Emerging Future: From Ego-System to Eco-System Economies. San Francisco: Berret-Koehler Publishers.). Level 1 is superficial listening. It basically serves the function that the listener wants his or her opinions or judgments to be reconfirmed. In level 2 the listener notices and acknowledges differences and captures new information from the other side. Scharmer calls this level ‘factual listening’. In level 3 the listener is not only aware of the other person but actually sees things from the other perspectives, walks in the shoes of the other person. The deepest level of listening, ‘generative listening’ as Scharmer calls it, allows the people connect with each other.

It is this generative listening what you need to practice if you want to help unfold organizational potential and performance.

Hence, forget traditional organizational development!

My friend and colleague I mentioned at the beginning of this post was right: Traditional organizational development is a dead end street.

Posted in: Centeredness, Creative Economy, innovation, Leadership

Leave a Comment (0) →

2016: what’s to BE


Yes, I do have a number of new year’s resolution.

colored_custom_year_text_11844Here is a list of topics I would like to write about:

  • Building a Happy Workplace
  • Forget HR: Why “HR” is detrimental to organizational health and business growth (and what we need to do instead)
  • The forgotten dimension of innovation
  • Who ought to be the real business enabler in an organization
  • 1+1+1 = x.  Measuring organizational performance
  • Shareholder value is the dumbest idea in the world
  • Innovation: it’s all about people
  • Leadership in the Creative Economy
  • HIP Camp 2016 – Driving Performance, Inspiring Innovation
  • What we can learn from Social Businesses
  • Myopia of traditional economic theory

Conferences I will speak at or plan to attend are the following:

  • KAS meets WEF, Davos, Switzerland (Jan 20-24, 2016)
  • Corporate Social Responsibility Forum, Ludwigsburg, Germany (April 5-6, 2016)
  • Global Scrum Gathering, Orlando, Florida, USA (April 18-20, 2016)
  • PMI Global Congress EMEA, Barcelona, Spain (May 9-11, 2016)
  • PMI Global Congress North America, San Diego, CA, USA (Oct 2016)
  • Global Peter Drucker Forum, Vienna, Austria (Nov 2016)
  • HIP Camp 2016 – Driving Performance, Inspiring Innovation (location and date tbd)

It’s not all about work.

This is why I am looking forward to

  • Family time
  • Mindfulness. Being and motivate to be
  • Music: picking up my saxophone and clarinet again
  • Sports: skiing and snowboarding, taekwondo (3rd Dan?), running, hiking
  • the great outdoors

In other words, there are a lot of people, activities and things to look forward to in 2016.

I wish you all a Happy New Year!

 

Posted in: Centeredness, Company News, Creative Economy, Empowerment, Happiness, Institute, Keynotes, Leadership, TJEP company, Upcoming Events

Leave a Comment (0) →

4 simple questions that can help boost team spirit, performance and results


Every morning our team got together for our morning stand-up session.  It had become a daily routine.  The structure of these 15-minutes standups was simple: we reflected on our accomplishments of the previous day, our planned deliverables of the new day and any impediments we were facing and for which we were asking for help from within the team or outside.

More than a normal team sync session

This routine is common to many other teams.  What made our daily standups special was that we added a fourth element.  Once every team member talked about his or her accomplishments, planned deliverables and inquiries for help, he or she shared what would make him or her happy that very day.  This could be anything the team member deemed valuable.  For example, a desired outcome of a meeting, a report, a breakthrough idea, or an evening activity may it be sports, dinner, cinema or anything else.

Silly? No. Inspiring? Yes.

In the beginning adding this fourth element in our daily standups felt odd and, to some of us, even funny and silly.  Then, slowly things changed.  Sharing your personal desired happiness moment of the day by itself was special.  What made it unique was that every team member was listening to the others.  Knowing about what my teammates would make them happy, gave me a better understanding what moved them.  Then there were the happiness moments where my daily goal was to make my teammates happy, i.e., help them achieve their happiness moment.  This could be that I took over some of their work so that they could leave on time for their date in the evening.  Or, helping them prepare a session.  In either way, making my teammates happy, increased my own happiness even more.  And this showed in my own work, performance, mood and, last but not least, results.

Adding the fourth, decisive fourth question to your daily standup’s

Next time when you conduct your daily standup with your team, suggest to add a fourth question.  That is answer the following questions:

  1. What have I accomplished since yesterday (or the last standup meeting)?
  2. What do I plan to accomplish today (or until the next standup meeting)?
  3. What impediments do I face or see? Where do I need help?
  4. What makes me happy today?

Is it that simple? Yes, it is. Try it for a couple of 1-2 weeks and find out by yourself.  Of course, as always it is your choice to be happy or unhappy.

Posted in: Centeredness, Happiness

Leave a Comment (0) →

The Difference Between Focus and Tunnel Vision


tunnel-vision-01‘One more click, save the file and then close it.’ This is what I thought and did.  Or so I thought.  Because, did I really?  A few moments later my computer gave me the error message, “file upload not possible”.  Oops. What happened?
The last two hours my team and I were working on a project plan for the next six weeks.  It was a really creative and productive meeting.  Spirits were high. Not only could we reflect on our past accomplishments of the last three weeks.  We also had a clear picture of what we wanted to achieve the next couple of weeks.  In order to save time, we captured all planned work packages in an Excel file on a big screen for everyone to follow.  Once our session was finished I did some minor cosmetic changes to the file, saved it (or thought I did) and then closed it.  But, things did not go as planned. – Soon I found out that not only was the file not uploaded to our server, but it was nowhere to be found on my local computer.  If you ever worked on a file for a long time and then had to find out that the work of the past hour or so was erased, well, let’s put it this way: it does not make you happy.  So, this is where I was yesterday.  When I realized the dilemma I called our local IT support and asked for help.  Gee, I had no idea how these folks can be so calm and patient in moments like these.  They listened, asked some questions, guided me through some procedures on my computer.  And then – nothing.  The file could not be found.  Sh…t.  Furor and frustration grew in me rapidly.  ‘How was this possible?! I saved the file before I closed it.’ The next 2 hours I continued sorting through all the files I touched yesterday.  Time stood still.  The more I searched the more my frustration vanished.  And was replaced by resignation.

What does this story have to do with ‘focus’?  A lot.  In the moment of ‘crises’, if you want to call the described dilemma, I completely concentrated on this one file, the product of two hours of work.  I tried everything technically possible to retrieve it.  And I lost time for other, more productive and creative things.  When it became clear that the file was lost, I should have stopped looking for it.  This is hard at times, very difficult indeed. Facing the unquestionable truth often is.  And yet, it may be the only thing to do.
What I mixed was ‘focus’ and ‘tunnel vision’.
The only thing I could think of was this one file, the energy it absorbed to create it and the frustration I felt when I was afraid that I lost this piece of work.  I did not look left or right.  As a result, I did not only lose the file I also relinquished valuable time for other things.  The 2-3 hours I spent searching for the file could have been used to re-do the work.  As a matter of fact it would have taken me probably only around 45 to 60 minutes.  I may not have been happy about this extra work.  But possibly even improving it.  And I could have done something else afterwards.  Learn from my technical incapabilities and move on.

Learning to focus

clarityToo often when we focus on something we completely phase out our surroundings.  Losing sight of the bigger picture.  We are trapped in our tunnel vision.  We think we can see the light at the end of the tunnel.  But actually it may only be a remnant of our imagination.  When you want to or need to focus, do so with a peripheral vision.  Relax, breathe, become aware of what’s happening around you, then start your work.  But not without closing your eyes, ears and senses for your surroundings. Be present and focused at the same time. It is not a contradiction; it is a help and path to a fuller awareness, concentration, more productive and meaningful work and happiness.

So, what happened with my lost file?  I never found it again. Luckily I had a printout of the table my team and I were working on.  Retyping the file we actually found a number of mistakes, shortcomings and gaps we did not recognize earlier.  We corrected them in no time and after less than an hour we had a new, corrected and actually better project plan.

Posted in: Centeredness, Miscellaneous

Leave a Comment (0) →

This Season Give Yourself One of the Greatest Gifts Possible


Holiday Season – It’s the time of the year when we spend extra time with our beloved ones, family and friends, celebrate, exchange gifts, having a wonderful time.  And be happy.

What is it that makes us happy?  Is it the special time of Christmas?  Or is the moments where we make other people happy that give us this special kick?  Or is the many little things that make us happy, that make these days truly special?

Personally, I think it is the combination of these things.  And more?  Whatever it is, enjoy it, live it, feel it, be actively aware of these special moments, be and live in the present to the fullest.

And then, go a step further and ask yourself how you can carry this spirit to tomorrow, next week, next month and next year.  I am not talking about developing a big new year’s resolution – which most people tend to forget after a few days anyway.  I am talking about a simple, yet possibly disturbing, life-changing and at the same time exciting thing:  being yourself.

http://www.lifehack.org/articles/communication/when-you-start-being-yourself-these-10-amazing-things-will-happen.html?fb_action_ids=10152654440889315&fb_action_types=og.shares

When You Start Being Yourself, These 10 Amazing Things Will Happen

When you start being yourself, amazing things will happen.  Not for last, you will be happier.  Explore yourself, be.

Then share your experiences.  Create the space for others to find and accept themselves. This way you, too, can contribute to making others happier.  And this in return will make you even happier.

Simple? Yes. But who says that happiness has to be difficult to find.  It’s already here.

Happy Holidays!

 

Posted in: Centeredness, Happiness, Institute

Leave a Comment (0) →

A Happy, Happy Conference – PMI NL Summit 2014


I have just returned from a fabulous conference:  the PMI Netherlands Summit 2014 in beautiful Zeist, NL.

It was an honor and great pleasure to open the conference with my own keynote on “Leadership, Happiness and Project Success“.  In my presentation I explained why and how leadership and happiness are the key ingredients to project success.

A lot has been said and written about leadership and how it affects project success.  But ‘happiness’?!  Well, not so much.  This is sad I think for ‘happiness’ brings in the human factor into the equation.  It’s ok to satisfy the customer.  But is it sufficient?  I don’t think so.  If you and your team aim for a happy team and a happy customer it can take your project to a higher level.

Scientific research has shown that our brains work better when they are ‘happy’.  And when our brains are at ‘happy’ that positivity will ripple out to others and can raise productivity.  Hence, whenever you aim to promote happiness in your project you can likely improve performance and productivity.  Not bad, isn’t it?!

So, what is ‘happiness’?  How do you define it?  

Well, not so fast.  I am not sure if you can or actually want to come up with a formal definition of ‘happiness’.  It is personal, subjective in nature.  And yet, (most) people will agree that ‘happiness’ is great and worthwhile striving for.  The 3 P’s – pleasure, purpose, passion – give us a hint what ‘happiness’ entails.  In the context of a project I think that the purpose and passion characteristics of happiness a central.  In other words, you and your team have to have a common understanding of the motivation and vision of the project.  They need to know, support and share it.  Not by force but because they want to – on the project, individual and team levels.

Have a look at my presentation to learn more about it.

Happiness is a choice

At the conclusion of my keynote I invited the audience to take action to create a happier life.  For this purpose I handed out GREAT DREAM postcards.  It lists 10 key to happier living based on a review of the latest scientific research relating to happiness.

Everyone’s path to happiness is different, but the research suggests these Ten Keys consistently tend to have a positive impact on people’s overall happiness and well-being. The first five (GREAT) relate to how we interact with the outside world in our daily activities. The second five (DREAM) come more from inside us and depend on our attitude to life.

GREAT DREAMS postcard image

I want to thank the Action for Happiness movement for providing these postcards at no charge.

Take the Action for Happiness pledge

Giving a keynote on ‘happiness’ is a great experience. It gave me the chance not only to talk about happiness to a large audience but actually make people happy.  What a wonderful and fulfilling opportunity!

Learning more about happiness and how it can help us grow successful projects is one thing.  Applying the principles in our daily lives is another and more powerful thing.  Hence, I am asking you, the reader, to visit the Action for Happiness website, take the Action for Happiness pledge and start living a happier life.

Action for Happiness Pledge
“I will try to create more happiness and less unhappiness in the world around me”

 

Posted in: Centeredness, Happiness, Keynotes, Leadership, Project success

Leave a Comment (0) →

Open Forum Davos 2014: Too many problems, too little solutions


Today was Day 2 of the workshop “Chairlift to Innovation”.  The weather and snow were spectacular.  In other words, perfect conditions for an innovative workshop.  So, what did we discuss today and what vision did we build?  Here we go:

IMG_4929The Dilemma:  Too many problems, too little solutions

This year’s panel discussions at the Open Forum Davos were very appealing.  The WEF picked topics that were guaranteed to attract a large audience.  Panelists were well-known celebrities and experts in the field.  Unlike in previous years, audience interaction in the form a question and answer session was possible.  And yet all panels faced a severe dilemma:  panelists shared their ideas and described problems.  Unfortunately, no solutions were being developed or portrayed.  This was and is frustrating and disturbing.  Frustrating because you could expect panelists to at least outline ideas for problems.  Disturbing because it becomes very difficult if not impossible for the WEF to achieve the objectives of the Open Forum, namely “to develop the insights, initiatives and actions necessary to respond to current and emerging challenges”.

What are some of the causes for this gap?  For one, it is the way the facilitator is asking questions.  Then, the panelists themselves did not really go out and offer too many solutions or food for thought that could inspire the audience to become active.  Last but not least, audience interaction exists but is limited.

As a consequence chances for “new insights, initiatives and actions necessary to respond to current and emerging challenges” were missed.

The Vision:  An interactive workspace nurturing the development of solutions and results in the form of concrete projects

The Open Forum Davos not only addresses pressing global problems.  Panelists spark a discussion for solutions and results.  They offer new solutions, thus inspiring the audience to get involved, too.  Following a Q&A session participants are invited to share their thoughts and ideas in an open workspace.  The WEF facilitates this exchange of ideas.  Either on site or virtually in an online community.  Interested individuals or organizations can meet with like-minded people.  The idea, however, is not to describe problems but to actively help those interested growing their ideas into concrete projects for social change.  Progress of such projects could be tracked on a central online platform.  1-2 months prior to the next Open Forum project results can be displayed.  Projects that made the greatest impact could be awarded by the WEF and presented in a special event at the next Open Forum.

Next Steps:

  • The Institute for Project and Business Transformation (name changed to “Human Business Academy for Today’s Economy” in December 2016)will reach out to the organization team of the Open Forum Davos and share the results of today’s “Chairlift to Innovation” workshop.
  • In addition, we will finetune the vision and derive possible actions to be tested in a smaller environment than the Open Forum to test their viability.

Please let us know if you, too want to get involved in improving the Open Forum Davos 2015 thus developing insights, initiatives and actions necessary to respond to current and emerging challenges on the global and local level.

 

Posted in: Centeredness, innovation, WEF

Leave a Comment (0) →
Page 1 of 3 123