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Applying Leverage Points for Greater Project Success




Project, program and portfolio management are people intensive activities, subject to personalities, differing agendas, and misunderstandings. Successful managers are those who, while not immune from these challenges, correctly assess and determine how to navigate political minefields. Personal case studies, along with examples from other people and industries, provide a proven means, first to accept that these challenges will arise, and second to work through them and achieve desired outcomes.

balance_bar_tipped_400_clr_6313Leverage points are activities within a complex system where a small shift in one thing can produce big changes in everything. This idea is embedded in legend: the silver bullet, the trim tab, the miracle cure, the secret passage, the magic password, the single hero who turns the tide of history, the nearly effortless way to cut through or leap over huge obstacles. We want to know where they are and how to get our hands on them. Leverage points are points of power.

An example in the physical world:  trim tabs are small surfaces connected to the trailing edge of a larger control surface on a boat or aircraft, used to control the trim of the controls—to counteract hydro- or aerodynamic forces and stabilize the boat or aircraft in a particular desired attitude without the need for the operator to constantly apply a control force. This is done by adjusting the angle of the tab relative to the larger surface. This reduces the work of the engine by reducing the amount of manual control necessary, as well as providing for greater efficiency by keeping the ship in the ideal orientation for the conditions.

What is the equivalent trim tab [leverage points] in the world of people and relationships? L2M2:  Leadership, Learning, Means, and Motivation. Examples where these “forces” apply include:

  • Speaking truth to power
  • Getting past resistance to achieve results
  • Working through a difficult encounter
  • Applying controlled anger
  • Negotiating with reluctant stakeholders
  • “Selling” and implementing a new process

The simple model of key leverage points—L2M2—may perhaps be sufficient as a recipe for greater project success. All four factors are necessary for this recipe to succeed:

Leadership is a well-articulated communication from the organization of what kind of new behavior is required and why it is required, along with a road map of the change that will take place over time.

Learning is the process of supplying the knowledge and skill necessary for individuals to carry out new behaviors. It includes learning support from the PMBOK, project leadership, and business skills, etc..

Means are all the resources necessary to carry out the behaviors, including tools, organizational policies and structures, and time.

Motivation is the formal and informal system of incentives and consequences that reinforce new behaviors. These are differentiated by role so that the required role-based behaviors are supported in all parts of the organization.

Behavior begins to change when all four factors work in concert. Without Leadership, people will not know how to apply their new knowledge and skill in concert with business strategic and tactical objectives. Without Learning, people may know what they are supposed to do from Leadership, but not know how to do it. Without Means, people may know what to do and how to do it, but not have the tools and resources to carry it out. Without Motivation, people may know what leaders want, and how to do it, and have the resources to carry it out, but simply not bother to do it.

Challenges present themselves on every project and program. An attitude of acceptance is required to get past initial paralysis and/or frustration, then to assess, design, and apply an action plan. Base actions on leverage from L2M2.  Foremost, a belief in ability to prevail is required. An individual’s positive attitude that today is a good day and tomorrow will be even better provides the means to embrace and implement leverage points.

It is important to focus on people, relationships, values, and skills. Modify an approach depending on the situation, always knowing there are patterns in how nature and people respond. Tap leverage points in those patterns as a means towards greater project success. Changing a mindset to embrace change or a new approach may perhaps be the simplest and most powerful leverage point for an individual to implement. Apply a key phrase:  “I can think differently about this.”

Examples and a paper on this topic are available from the PMI Global Congress North America 2014.

Randall L. Englund, Englund Project Management Consultancy, www.englundpmc.com

Posted in: Guest Blogs, Leadership, Project Management

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Surviving in a Matrix: Simple Techniques for Effective Project Management in a Matrix Organization


You love projects.  You love good project management.  And you love the exhilaration of power teams and project success.  BUT you are struck in a matrix?  Not the matrix of the movie.  But the matrix of a strong line organization where projects have all but a miserable existence.  The line organization is dominating, politics is prevalent, people care more about securing their own posts, maintaining the status quo and thus focus on their daily tasks, not willing to look outside their box or even beyond their own desk.  Projects?!  Gee, hell no!  Those are activities where you have to work with people from other departments, maybe even in cross-functional teams.  But, what do those folks know about my area of expertise.  Nothing!  Hence, it is better to keep things as they are.

Does this sound familiar? Or, have you ever experienced or heard of such an organization and setting? – If so, continue reading.

Surviving in a Matrix: Simple Techniques for Effective Project Management in a Matrix Organization from Thomas Juli

On Thursday, 2 October 2014 from 11:30 AM – 1 PM EST I gave a free webinar for the IT Metrics and Productivity Institute.  The webinar is entitled “Surviving in a Matrix: Simple Techniques for Effective Project Management in a Matrix Organization”.  In this webinar I introduce a simple, yet very pragmatic approach to structure, plan and set-up a project in a matrix organization with strong line management and a weak project culture. I explain the need and value for developing a compelling project motivation, vision and objectives. I outline how to engage stakeholders in building a work package structure, outlining a project organization, implementing an early warning system for plan deviations, establishing risk analysis and management. Last but not least, I elaborate on how to cultivate continuous learning in a matrix organization.
Don’t stay stuck in your matrix.  Learn how to survive in your matrix, introduce effective project management techniques and become a master of your own project success.

Posted in: Empowerment, Leadership, Project Management, Project success

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Let Happiness Turn Your Project Around



Ever wondered what could turn around your struggling project, or shape a project that it tells a story and convinces others just be hearing about the project?  Well, there could be a simple remedy.  And that is to link happiness to your project.  – Ok, let’s start slow.

This week I conducted a seminar on project leadership.  In one of the central exercises smaller groups worked on fictitious projects.  Seminar attendants could pick whatever topic, issue or question they cared about.  One group chose to ponder how to improve time management for students obtaining a graduate degree while having to work full-time and nourishing a family.  Another group analyzed ways and means to improve a business partnership with suppliers.  And yet another decided to talk about the need of drones for the German military.  At the end of each exercise session teams presented their results.  They shared their views what motivated them to work on their particular project, what they envisioned and what specific goals they were pursuing.  Not too surprisingly the project with the military drone got rather passive looks and no real feedback when they presented their project.  This changed when I asked the teams to address a simple question with respect to their project.  “How does your project contribute to happiness?”  That’s it; just this simple question.

HappinessI was curious what the teams would come up with.  Especially the drone project.  After all, linking a military weapon, defensive as it may be intentioned, with happiness?!  That would be a tough sell.  Well, things did not quite work out as assumed.  When it was their turn everybody expected them to talk about the various functionalities of a military drone, its specifications and how to use it in combat.  But instead the group talked about peace enforcement, conflict prevention and support for human rights.  And they talked about it in an appealing way that reached people and caused their emotional reaction.  All of a sudden, nobody was thinking of the weapon any more but how to help achieve world peace.  What happened?  Addressing the question “How does your project contribute to happiness?” project members checked for their inner motivation – not warefare but peace and stability – and they shared it openly and honestly.  This touched people, they could relate to the team’s motivation, even identify with it.  Instead of being doubtful and deprecating, not only did they appreciated the project presentation but even asked how they could help the team.

A project which moments earlier was dull, cold and tiring became lively, meaningful and attractive.  A simple question “How does your project contribute to happiness?” triggered the change of the nature of the project, its momentum and the attitude of team members and observers.  So, next time you face a troubling project, ask the team this question, “how does your project contribute to happiness?, and see what happens.

 

Posted in: Happiness, Leadership, Project failure, Project Management

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A wide-angle lense for your project efforts


gripWhile some of my peers are still thriving for planning tools and methodologies to strengthen their grip on projects, others offer ten keys to a happier living and pursuing a great dream. It’s the summary of this month’s PMI Netherlands Chapter’s 3rd Summit on the thin line between project success and project failure. Discrete task management as a 20th Century invention, cultivated from the times of Frederick Winslow Taylor‘s book The Principles of Scientific Management to David Allen‘s Getting Things Done. Resemblance with the classic Divide & Rule strategy elements is surprising:

  • creating or encouraging divisions among the subjects to prevent alliances that could challenge the sovereign
  • aiding and promoting those who are willing to cooperate with the sovereign
  • fostering distrust and enmity between local rulers
  • encouraging meaningless expenditures that reduce the capability for political and military spending

Proven project success factors however are e.g. trust, collaboration, communication, and contribution to a greater cause. Research led Daniel Pink to rethink Maslow’s hierarchy of needs (I bet you know this pyramid) and come up with 21st Century drivers for our professional and personal motivation:

  1. Autonomy – the desire to direct our own lives.
  2. Mastery — the urge to get better and better at something that matters.
  3. Purpose — the yearning to do what we do in the service of something larger than ourselves.

sagrada familiaConnecting dots, zooming out of discrete tasks to larger structures up to the organization, value chain or customer journey shows a wide-angled view:

  • Working on brick by boring brick appears to the final stage of the Sagrada Família in Barcelona.
  • A piece of Java code skips a mouse click in an application form, raising chances a customer will continue buying an insurance policy.
  • Implementing legislation in processes, systems and information products avoids penalties and saves cash for investments.
  • A proper configuration of a server keeps hackers out and the business focused on their core business.

A monthly review of your risk log or skipping the benefits section in a mandatory business case for a ‘compliance project’ will get a different meaning, once you understand the effects of your efforts. Costs turn into values. System integration enables business sustainability. Daily routines like a stand-up or check-in become an index of project health or happiness of team members. What drives you home? And back to work tomorrow?

Posted in: Guest Blogs, Leadership, Project Management, Project success

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Top Secrets of a Project Leader to Build a Strong Performing Team


The leadership role is one of the most coveted ones, but also the most challenging one. In the words of Peter Drucker, the father of modern management techniques, “Management is doing things right; leadership is doing the right things“. Businesses have evolved over the years and job roles have changed over time, but what remains crucial to success is the presence of an effective leader who has the capability to build a strong team.

Leadership Struggel

While in many cases there are instances of born leaders who have led from a very young age, a large number of leaders are born out of tough situations that push them to perform better than others and thus lead the team. If you have the talent and the desire to excel and be in a  project leadership role, the best way to go about it is to follow your intuitive project leadership skills and have a deep understanding of the fellow members of your team. When handling a particular project, a project leader can hardly move even a step ahead without support from his team. As we delve deeper into what makes a project manager click and become successful, here are a few insights that can help you with the process.

Lead by example

You might have heard this multiple times and eventually learned to ignore it. However, this is one piece of advice that can fetch you many followers in the form of team members who make up a strong-functioning team. As soon as an employee is hired, he or she looks around for a mentor and some inspiration. To be able to create an effective team, it is important to provide positive inspiration that your team members can follow. If you want your team to be in office early, you would have to do the same. If you want a degree of discipline about work deadlines, you would have to submit your work at the earliest opportunity.

It may be tough to always play the role model, but it can also be rewarding in the end when you know you have a strong team that can take on more critical projects in the future. This also ensures that you are training every individual to be a project leader who can carry the mantleon their own once you have moved on to a higher role than project manager.

Be the comrade

Often leading a team or project is equated with being on a higher platform than the rest, and this leads to aloofness from the team and labels a leader as unapproachable. This hinders progress as your team members are not able to confide in you about their problems, be it about their project-related issues or even about their personal lives. Being a friend helps. It helps to know what’s blocking your team members’ progress and stopping them from providing quality work.

Each hire involves a lot of time and money for the organization as well as the team. As a leader, if you are able to be a friend and comrade who can nurture and grow individuals instead of letting them go, it will help in building a strong and tenacious team filled with experience and resilience.

Listen and give recognition

In the book The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People, author Stephen R. Covey says, “Most people do not listen with the intent to understand; they listen with the intent to reply.”This attitude can be very harmful for the role of a leader. When your team members are trying to articulate something in times of a crisis, they should be able to do it without fear of being ostracized from the team or being labeled as over the top. Sharing ideas or apprehensions about a project, without fear, often provides new insight and solutions to existing problems. Contributing to the team and being recognized for it gives a team member a sense of accomplishment. Listening to even the smallest of ideas and promoting experimental processes can excite a team and encourage them to work harder.

Be the pillar

Being a leader calls for being the strong pillar of confidence. Being a straight shooter and asking direct questions can clear up the air and project you as being fair under all conditions. These actions require a lot of confidence and can in turn make you an immediate favorite among your team members. It assures team members that you can take charge of things and will be there to back them up whenever required. The true leader always backs up his or her team even in dire circumstances and always makes them feel safe. Ultimately, this feeling is what helps build loyalty among team members and their team lead.

So, which project leadership skills are you going to inherit? Do you have any other qualities to highlight? Share your thoughts with us.

Posted in: Guest Blogs, Leadership, Project Management

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3 Steps from Zombie Projects to WOW Projects


Wikepedia defines Zombies as fictional undead creatures regularly encountered in horror and fantasy themed works. They are typically depicted as mindless, reanimated corpses with a hunger for human flesh, and particularly for human brains in some depictions.

A project is a project is a project?

Who am II wish it were this easy.  The good news is that more and more companies and organizations realize the value of project – and to a lesser extent the need and value of good project management.

I have seen, worked on and led many projects.  The ones most memorable were those projects where things were flowing.  That is, the team worked as a team, performance was outstanding due to synergy effects, quality of deliverables exceeded clients’ expectations and everyone was just happy and proud to be part of the project.  I call such projects WOW projects.  And it this kind of projects I love to work on, build or lead.

Zombie projects may still get the basics of project management right

My strong desire for WOW projects may explain my frustration every time I work on or for “suboptimal” projects that have more or less nothing to do with WOW.  It is not that these projects lack project management fundamentals.  Indeed, often they do cover the basics.  That is:

(1) project objectives were defined (mostly top-down by management),

(2) functional and non-functional requirements were described and documented (more or less),

(3) a project organization was put in place,

(4) a project plan was posted on the walls, and

(5) project management tools available.

So far for the basics.

And yet, there was nothing which resembled the WOW factor even at the lowest level.

What’s wrong!?

Zombie projects lack the soul and spirit of WOW projects

While these projects covered the basics of project management they lacked the “soul” or “spirit” that makes WOW projects tick.  Team morale on such projects is often in the lower ranks.  The quality of deliverables is satisfactory at best.  Long working hours are the norm and this is reflected in errors and delays in deliverables.  Transparency about progress, actual issues and potential risks is mirky and not welcome – because, after all, management wants to hear good news.

Working on such projects can be tiring and energy draining.  It is a job, ok. But no more.

Does this sound familiar?  If so, continue reading.

3 steps to WOW projects

The causes for suboptimal projects are not limited to the lack of leadership or a true team.  It is more than that.  It is an attitude and a principle approach how you build, grow and nurture projects.  So, let’s have a look at what it takes to build the foundation for WOW projects to evolve:

3 steps to wow - picture 1Step 1: Listening and learning

The first step to growing a WOW project is active and intense listening, learning about the needs, motivation and vision of people and the organizations.  It helps sorting out the playing field of the project and how it fits into the larger system of an organization and its people.

Step 2: Developing awareness

Based on the insights of step 1 gather your project team and stakeholders and find out what you truly try to achieve in your project.  This means, find out and agree on the MVP’s of your project, i.e., the motivation, the vision and the project objectives of your project.  Expand this exercise to the MVP’s of individual team members and the team as an organizational unit.

Once you have developed strong MVP’s, work on engagement rules for nurturing collaboration, promoting performance, cultivating learning and ensuring results.

Step 3: Performing and aligning

Now, walk your talk.  Start working, practice, fail and learn from your mistakes.  Make necessary alignments and perform.

WOW projects evolve and are very much alive

3 steps to wow - picture 2Steps 1 -3 may imply that they are sequential.  This is right and wrong.  When you start a project you go through this sequence.  However, aligning always includes listening and learning which is Step 1 of growing a WOW project.  This takes you back to the beginning of the 3-step process.  Insights from each step are integrated in each of the other steps and vice versa.

From this perspective it is more practical to depict the process as a Venn diagram which each circle standing for one of the three steps.  The intersection of these three circles is where the WOW ignites and spreads.

3 steps to wow - picture 3In other words, the combination of listening & learning, developing awareness, performing & aligning spark WOW projects.

As you iterate each of the three steps, border lines blur, it becomes increasingly difficult to depict one step from the other.  One element feeds the others and vice versa.  The iterative learning and growth process of this project become intertwined and infinite.  This is illustrated in the picture on the left.

 

Start growing your WOW project today

Even the longest journey starts with the first step.  On this token, I encourage you and your team to have a closer look at your own project(s).  Follow the three steps described above and start building your own WOW project today.

Need help?  Please contact me.  I help you build WOW projects through customized workshops and trainings.  Workshops can be as short as 2 hours or several days depending on your needs.  Or, if you like, I can accompany your journey over a period of several weeks through coaching and consulting.

Posted in: Centeredness, Project Management, Project success, WOW projects

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Your Path to Happy Leadership and Project Success


WebinarankündigungToday, 18 September 2013, I will be giving a free webinar for the PMI Information Systems Community of Practice entitled “Leadership, Happiness and Project Success”.   Follow this LINK to learn more about dial-in information

2 Ingredients for project success

In this webinar I am exploring two crucial ingredients for project success: empowering leadership and happiness.  I explains why and how leadership can help build successful projects by actively accounting for happiness on the individual, group, project and organizational levels.  Attendees will learn how to find a clear focus of what they really want to achieve, create a strategy through principle centered leadership, resolve project issues and align their priorities for happiness and project success.

Target Audience:  YOU

The presentation targets anyone who is sincerely interested in finding new and transforming ways to project success.  These can be individuals, project managers, project team members, line managers, line organizations, companies or social groups.

Free Registration

Registration is free for active PMI members.  If you are not a PMI member and still want to view the presentation, have a look at my handout on Slideshare. Or, if you like to receive a pdf version of the presentation, please contact me directly.

What’s next?

Institute FolieIn my webinar I am talking about my personal vision of helping build an Institute for Project and Business Transformation.  This cannot be done by oneself.  Instead, it takes the effort of like-minded people and a strong, performing team.  On this token I want to invite you to join this great effort.  Stay tuned for updates on this new and exciting project.

 

Posted in: Centeredness, Company News, Empowerment, Happiness, Leadership, Project Management, Project success, Training

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3 pillars for success: Finding a clear focus, effective strategy and aligned priorities


Today I have come across a truly inspirational video showing Tony Robbins speaking about The Art of Focusing.  What does this have to do with projects?  A lot, i.e. if you are interested in project success I highly recommend you take a few minutes to watch Robbins’ speech.

Jaime Neely of Trendhunter summarizes the key points very nicely:

“In this Anthony Robbins speech, the award-winning author and motivational speaker presents his three pillars of success. To find success and absolute happiness in life, Robbins believes that individuals must first find a clear focus of what it is they want to accomplish; second, they must create a strategy with the best tools possible; and third, they must resolve any and all inner conflicts.

  1. The first step requires evaluating where you are right now and having a clear vision of where it is you want to be. Robbins believes that focusing on what you don’t want or where you don’t want to be will waste all of your positive energy.
  2. The second step requires making yourself a map (a strategy or plan) and finding yourself a mentor who can provide you with encouragement and shortcuts.
  3. The last step involves ridding yourself of any conflicting priorities or commitments.
    80 percent of success rates in anything depend on psychology, while the other 20 percent depends on mechanics.

[In a nutshell:]  Finding a clear focus, effective strategy and aligned priorities are the components of Robbins’ recipe for success.”

What about my project success?

Robbin’s 3 pillars for success are easily applicable to the project world, too, namely:

  1. evaluating where you are right now and having a clear vision of where it is you want to be:
    ->
    Develop a solid Motivation, Vision and Project Goals with your team and follow through.  Don’t know how, check out my seminar “Building your MVP for Project Success
  2. making yourself a map (a strategy or plan):
    -> The 5 Leadership Principles for Project Success give a you this map
  3. ridding yourself of any conflicting priorities or commitments:
    -> If you and your team have developed an MVP for your project, this gives you a clear direction.  Stick to it and follow through.

 

Posted in: Centeredness, Leadership, Project Management

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Questions about self-organizing teams


Following up my webinar about “The Illusion and Promise of Self-Organizing Teams” I gave on March 6, 2013 I have consolidated all questions asked during and immediately following the webinar.  As promised I will answer each of the questions in the coming weeks. In the meantime PLEASE share your thoughts about the following questions about self-organizing teams:

1)   Definition and understanding of self-organizing teams vs. managed or self-governed teams

Marc L.:  What’s the difference between a self organizing team and a mob?

Dinesh K: How do you rate productivity of different team (managed vs. self-organized vs. self-governed team?

Thomas D.: Do Managed Teams use teamwork?

2)   Development of self-organizing teams

Wilma L.: how does the self-organizing team begin to organize itself for a project? Who determines that this is going to be a SO team, especially in a corporate environment?

Rajakrishnan C.: A typical project team may comprise of people with different experience levels and pay scales. A junior member may not feel as equally responsible for the success of the project as a senior high paying resource. Will this hamper self organizing capability of the team? If so how do we handle such situations?

Alonso A.: Any additional suggestions for teams that are new and still going thru the storming phase?

3)   Roles in self-organizing teams

Elise O.: If this is a self-organizing team, why are we still framing it in terms of “YOU and YOUR team”?  It sounds as though you still need a leader/mentor/sponsor role to get this to work.  Does it really become a team where everyone is a peer?

Naga B.: What will be the role of project manager in self oraganizing teams?

Xavier Z.: what about the risks specific with scrum team with a scrummaster but without project manager?

4)   The MVP Model in action (Motivation, Vision, Project Objectives)

Douglas D.: Can you talk to the idea that, part of the value add for an engagement, is gaining, and documenting, the MVP?  In other words, they project team may not have been able to articulate this until you showed up.

Milagros L.: Thinking in the kick-off meeting, when would conduct the MVP workshop? After or before it?

Mounir G.: How you can apply MVP in a hierarchy, military environment where top down commands are applied?

Loui H.: What would you do if some stakeholder or team members don’t want to play along?

Nihad K.: Here is where the project sponsor gets into the mix.  Isnt it really about their vision?

William P.: What about assigning, defining roles?  Do the team members work out who does what?

5)   Empowerment

Oscar S.: which is the most important empowerment effect in the management?

6)   Acknowledgement

Krithika V.: is monetary acknowledgement (bonus) allowed ?

7)   Promoting performance

Shilpa E.:Q: In self organizing teams, micromanagment is out of question, then how can we promote self performance to ensure project milestones?

8)   Conflict management

Noemi J.: what about conflict management inside self organizing and cross-functional teams? how should a project manager manage it?

9)   Virtual teams

Justus B., Mitra B., Timothy B.: Do the same rules shown today also apply for vitural teams, for example in a culturally diverse environment?

10)         Cultural differences and respect, moral, ethics

Rebecca K: It seems that cultural differences can be the source of disrespect. How can this be overcome?

11)         Project management vs. project leadership

Samuel J.: Dr. Juli has separated Project Management and Project Leadership.  Would he suggest that the PM should aim to be the Project Leader in order to be able to assert authority as necessary?

12)         Project challenges and the right leadership style

Shilpa E. Micromanagement or Delegation has been a question? But to meet the business goal in very rough projects which would help?

13)         A good project manager

Aida C.: How do you know if you are a good project manager other than the hard results which come in the end?

14)         Self-organizing teams and the PMBOK

Cory P.: Good luck mapping these concepts to the PMBOK

 

Posted in: Agile, Empowerment, Leadership, Project Management

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Free Webinar “The Illusion and Promise of Self-Organizing Teams” – March 6, 2013


On Wednesday March 6 I gave a free webinar on “The Illusion and Promise of Self-Organizing Teams” on on Wednesday March 6th, 2013 at 12:00pm (US Eastern Time, Coordinated Universal Time -5 hours).

NOTE:  If you happen to be one of the 989 individuals who attended the webinar and still have queastions, please leave comment below or send an email to tj@thomasjuli.com.  I will respond to all questions in due time.  Thank you!

For topic details, please visit PMI’s website. Click here for Details!

Content:

Teams and teamwork are the heart and soul of every project. This is especially true for agile teams. It is not the individual performance or accomplishment that counts but that of the team. Just like in team sports the team succeeds and fails together. Interestingly Agilists propose self-organizing teams. But what does “self-organizing” mean? If teams are self-organizing why do so many teams and projects fail?

This lecture sheds light on self-organizing teams. It explains what distinguishes them from manager-led and self-governing teams. It then outlines the ingredients that self-organizing teams need in order to develop and prosper.

Self-organizing teams have an immense potential for achieving powerful results on a project. However, there is no guarantee that self-organizing teams will form and be able to sustain themselves. This is particularly the case in non-agile organizations. Under those circumstances it is important to know common pitfalls of self-organizing teams and learn to overcome them. The lecture will discuss difficulties in developing and nurturing self-organizing teams. And it will show what it takes to master these challenges. This is not an easy task. The returns, however, are multifold and worth the investment. Self-organizing teams can thus become a cornerstone of project success.

A corresponding whitepaper of this presentation is available, too.  Please click here.

 

Posted in: Agile, Company News, Keynotes, Leadership, Project Management, Upcoming Events

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